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eFocus Education February 2013

Klaus Haupt

EU programme management backstage

Working with partners outside the EU

While the above programmes are managed from Brussels, their global reach means that we work closely with a number of partners in non-EU countries. EU Delegations act as the eyes, ears and mouthpiece of the EU towards authorities and population in their host countries. A range of associations play a key role in promoting and representing EU programmes world-wide.

Klaus Haupt, Head of the Tempus Programme Unit at EACEA, gives an insight into how his team works with National Tempus Offices.

EU Delegations

A send-off event for Erasmus Mundus students organised by the EU Delegation, Jakarta
A send-off event for Erasmus Mundus students organised by the EU Delegation, Jakarta

EU Delegations in some 130 countries around the globe act as the eyes, ears and mouthpiece of the EU towards authorities and population in their host countries.

They play a major role in promoting EU programmes. For the higher education programmes this involves informing universities and students about the opportunities on offer. Delegations also advise the Commission and Agency in Brussels on the eligibility of non-EU universities forming part of a project under certain programmes.

Many Delegations organise special meetings to brief selected Erasmus Mundus students who are leaving for Europe. These meetings bring together the departing students with a number of alumni who can share their experiences of studying and living in Europe – from dealing with culture shock to university structures.

National Tempus Offices

Klaus Haupt, Head of the Tempus Programme Unit, gives an insight into how his team works with National Tempus Offices.

What is a National Tempus Office?
National Tempus Offices, or NTOs as we call them, consist of one dedicated person or a team of people, depending on the size of the partner country. They are appointed in close cooperation between the local Ministry of Education and the EU Delegation.

How are they funded? NTO meeting, September2010

What is their role?
They provide local support to projects on the ground. When a Call for Proposals is published, they promote the programme through national Information Days and information campaigns. They use their networks to help institutions search for project partners abroad. As they have such in-depth knowledge of education institutions and policies in their countries, they are consulted on applications during the selection process. NTOs monitor ongoing projects at least twice during their life-cycle, advising on changes to improve efficiency and effectiveness. They are even involved in the organisation of conferences and seminars to disseminate the findings of Tempus studies, carried out in their countries.

Why are they necessary? Could this work not be carried out by the EACEA?
NTOs play a very important role for us. In many of the Partner Countries, interpersonal relations are key. NTOs, with their in-depth knowledge of EU education policy, act as ambassadors for the programme on the ground, where they can 'translate' it into the local context. They liaise closely with the Ministry in setting the priorities for the programme and with the EU Delegations, to ensure projects stick to these priorities. Many have been working for the programme for many years and through their dedication and commitment, have become most trusted partners.

How are they funded?
NTOs are a very cost-effective resource: the costs of maintaining the network represent less than 1% of the Tempus budget. 

European integration studies associations (ECSAs)

ECSAEuropean integration studies associations (ECSAs) are partners of the Jean Monnet Programme in many countries of the world. It is an umbrella network for over fifty national associations, bringing together academics specialised in European integration studies. Their members participate in international research programmes, provide technical assistance and organise conferences. Their objectives are to promote high-level research and teaching in this area, to foster cooperation between universities, and to make their activities and resources more visible.

 

Alumnus and Student Associations

The Erasmus Mundus Alumni & Students Association (EMA) was originally set up as a network of students and alumni, a platform for ideas, and a meeting place for students and alumni where new initiatives could be born. It continues to serve its members' needs through its website, magazine, and its focus on course quality through a range of networks.

EMA also looks outside its membership and plays a key role in promoting and representing Erasmus Mundus world-wide, through its regional and country chapters and through presence at education fairs.

OCEANS plays a similar role for the EU's programmes for higher education cooperation with a range of industrialised countries - Australia, Canada, Japan, New Zealand, South Korea and the USA.

EMA alumni at a higher education fair in Brazil

EMA alumni at a higher education fair in Brazil


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Last update: 21/02/2013  Print | Top of page